Eat What They Ate; The First Thanksgiving Meal

By: Scott Davis | November 17, 2017

As we gear up for Thanksgiving next week (already?!), there’s plenty of preparation and planning that goes into the meal itself. There’s sure to be debates between family members about what should or should not make it to the dinner table, but why not cook a unique meal by going back to the beginning?

While turkey was possibly part of the first Thanksgiving meal, it is more likely that the table consisted of another type of fowl or duck. The differences don’t end there as that first meal and today’s Thanksgiving dinner have some changes. So once you get your turkey (or duck if you’re feeling a little more adventurous), head to these local stores and challenge yourself in creating a Thanksgiving meal that was close to the original meal.

Seafood

While the main focus of many Thanksgiving dinners over the years was fowl, historians believe that seafood was heavily featured in the first Thanksgiving dinner. Mussels, lobster, clams, and oysters were easily accessible in the New England region, and places like Eastern Market Seafood Co. and Bosco Fish & Seafood can make them accessible for your Thanksgiving dinner. It’s a different option for those not a fan of turkey, and offers a different flavor than the typical Thanksgiving dinner.

Vegetables

After you’ve perfected your turkey and decided what seafood items belong on your table, it’s time to focus on the sides. Vegetables have always been a popular side dish on Thanksgiving dinner, but if you wanted to try to get as close to the first dinner as possible, you should focus on corn, peas, and beans, which you can get at Red Truck Fresh Produce. If you want to get as close to the original Thanksgiving meal as possible, try making cornbread or even corn porridge.

Fruit

Much like turkey and vegetables, various fruit was found at the original Thanksgiving dinner and is still featured today. The first Thanksgiving dinner had fruit like blueberries, raspberries, and cranberries for everyone to enjoy. These are still heavily featured on the Thanksgiving table, but might be slightly different. Whether you’re looking to make blueberry muffins, raspberry cream, or cranberry sauce, you can head to Kutchey Family Market to pick up fresh fruit. If you want to feature these fruit in pie form, head to Achatz Handmade Pie Co. for the best fruit pies in metro Detroit.

Pie

We polled metro Detroit a few weeks ago about their favorite holiday pie, and pumpkin pie won by a considerable margin. Pilgrims would be very pleased with this result since they too enjoyed pumpkin pie after their large meal at the first Thanksgiving dinner. While the making of pumpkin pies are very different now than they were almost 400 years ago, you can still enjoy a scrumptious pumpkin pie by checking out our pie story from last week.

Whether you’re attempting to re-create the first Thanksgiving, or just trying to create the best meal for your family, your Metro Detroit Chevy Dealers wish you a very happy Thanksgiving!